Alternative Histories of Work and Labour: The Workers History Museum

Noble Horvath

David Dean, a Professor of History at Carleton University, as he discusses alternative histories of work and labour in the national capital region. September 21, 2020 by Active History Leave a Comment —Active History is proud to present a video each week from New Directions in Active History. The conference […]

David Dean, a Professor of History at Carleton University, as he discusses alternative histories of work and labour in the national capital region.


Active History is proud to present a video each week from New Directions in Active History. The conference took place at Huron University College on October 2-4, 2015 and brought together scholars, students, professionals and community members to discuss a wide range of topics pertaining to active history.

In this week’s video we hear from David Dean, a Professor of History at Carleton University, as he discusses alternative histories of work and labour in the national capital region. He primarily discusses the Workers’ History Museum in Ottawa, and how it focuses on some of the lost stories of unionized and non-unionized workers. Nicknamed “The Museum without Walls”, Dean discusses how they manage to function as a museum without a physical location. Much of their work is articulated through a powerful website, in which they display exhibits and research, as well as hosting historical walking tours through Ottawa. Dean also discusses the museum’s travelling exhibits, of which they have three or four that they are able to bring to schools, universities, heritage fairs, labour conferences, and many other events. Through this museum and their work, one of the goals is to increase public knowledge of labour unions and their history, attempting to battle the negative stereotypes surrounding the idea of unions. The most recent project in which the museum is engaged their Bank Street Project, which is developed around the historical stories related to work and business along Bank Street in Ottawa.



Video Transcripts:

00:11
and Bob Hatfield sends his apologies for
00:16
not being able to be here today so I’m
00:17
sort of their very big shoes to fill but
00:20
I’m going to be talking more generally
00:22
about the workers History Museum and
00:26
I’ve called this a museum without walls
00:28
which aptly describes the workers
00:31
history museum but I’ll begin with just
00:33
a few general remarks about the idea
00:35
behind the panel and that is about
00:37
Ottawa capital city as a commemorative
00:39
space as all of you know the
00:42
commemorative landscape of all of us
00:43
become colonized in recent years by
00:45
nationalists and decidedly militaristic
00:48
and conservative narratives heroes
00:51
monuments small statues and busts of
00:53
prominent military figures that
00:54
compliment or i’d argue counters the
00:57
non-elite representations of those who
00:59
fought and served in our national war
01:01
memorial or for example the war of 1812
01:04
monument which sort of ticks every box
01:06
about the myth of that war as a deciding
01:09
event information Canadian national
01:11
identity one of my students said the
01:13
only thing missing is a militant fever
01:16
and of course we have the victims of
01:19
communist monument which any reader of
01:21
active history knows very much knows all
01:23
about but because of the wonderful
01:24
article by burger Gregor friendships
01:27
advantage but this of course in some
01:30
ways is nothing new there’s a perfect
01:33
example of the champlain monument at
01:34
nepean point and the Anishinabe Scout he
01:37
was known for many decades as kneeling
01:39
Indian tracker this year he was renamed
01:43
or a couple years ago actually he was
01:45
renamed kitschy city on for my
01:48
pronunciation pronunciation of this mmm
01:51
weenie and he once stood at Champlain’s
01:54
feet looking gorgeous Leah and
01:55
respectfully at champlain great the
01:58
great Explorer who actually assaulted
02:00
Kaster life upside down but that’s
02:01
beside the point the Annunaki Scout is
02:04
now moved into the bushes at mayor’s
02:06
hill park near the near the bathrooms
02:08
and he still looks longingly over at
02:11
nepean point but he’s now his he’s got
02:14
at least his own space when at Carleton
02:17
we held an international symposium on
02:19
Champlain involved 20
02:21
13 and we had a lot of an IV and there’s
02:26
nobbut presence at the at the at the
02:29
clock ill and that site became a kiss I
02:33
of a spontaneous counter demonstration
02:35
we had a beautiful what many thought was
02:38
a beautiful song aamir show that was
02:41
happening at nepean point using a
02:43
Champlain as a character we actually
02:45
staged a counter protest by the Annunaki
02:49
scope by showing lots of flashlights
02:51
never in her own our own different
02:53
narrative which gave him a name gave him
02:56
a presence and Gables significance that
02:59
was up with anything to do with
03:01
Champlain and you can actually see some
03:04
of that on one of our students though
03:05
blogs just just Google history boots
03:09
that all come up so that was a
03:11
spontaneous counter-narrative if you
03:13
like to the counter narrative on the
03:14
Nepean point more recently a couple of
03:16
weeks ago the site of the victims of
03:19
communism monument proposed site for
03:21
that became a side of a demonstration
03:22
for the pictures of Harper ISM another
03:25
stage the follow of us wearing black and
03:27
carrying black Bart’s so these are
03:30
spontaneous temporary momentary counter
03:34
narratives using some of the monumental
03:37
spaces and otherwise as as spaces in
03:40
which you can tell different stories
03:41
what I would like to highlight today a
03:44
little bit is is the work of a museum
03:47
that was founded to tell stories that
03:49
were also somewhat counter narrative
03:51
they tell the stories that have
03:53
disappeared in the narratives of the
03:55
nationalist narratives the official
03:57
narratives that we see on Parliament
03:59
Hill namely the stories of workers the
04:02
stories of the labor movement the story
04:03
of the world that was shaped by workers
04:06
whether these workers are unionized or
04:08
not unionized wherever they were
04:10
employed whatever they did whether they
04:12
were employed in factories and shops or
04:14
or actually in homes but we are a museum
04:18
without walls we don’t have a physical
04:20
space and that has posed a particular
04:24
set of challenges for us i should say i
04:27
was involved in the predecessor of the
04:29
workers history museum and
04:31
my classes the projects with with those
04:33
people involved in the workers heritage
04:36
center we’re about to celebrate now
04:38
weary formulated the word as the workers
04:40
History Museum and we’re about to
04:42
celebrate our fifth anniversary in
04:43
January so we’ve been working together
04:46
collaboratively for for about five years
04:48
within the community and the loss of a
04:51
physical place the absence of a physical
04:52
space is something that has led being a
04:55
challenge but it’s also being something
04:57
that has led us to some very exciting
04:59
decisions and so what I wanted to do
05:01
today is just illustrate some of the
05:03
work that we’re doing and basically just
05:07
introduced to some of that the
05:09
strategies that we’ve done more very
05:10
small Museum where we’re funded by trade
05:14
unions or by City of Ottawa like
05:16
temporary grants it’s entirely volunteer
05:18
and the challenge of to telling our
05:21
story without having a museum has been a
05:24
very interesting journey so one of the
05:27
first things we did was of course build
05:28
a dramatic website so this is the
05:32
workers history website we have a
05:35
running banner which which tells
05:36
different stories and the usual links
05:40
one of the most important things that we
05:43
did very early on was to create a
05:44
walking tour which is what Bob was going
05:46
to lead us through and the walking tour
05:48
is a walk is one that starts down here
05:51
by the rideau canal goes around
05:52
Parliament can take in other sites from
05:56
the apartment because if you know why
05:58
you know that there’s an extraordinary
05:59
view from here which can tell the story
06:01
of work and industry and working life
06:04
across both sides of the river both in
06:07
Ottawa Lower Town but also over and get
06:10
no huh and the walking tour then comes
06:13
back to to spark street
06:17
central area so it’s it for example
06:20
stopping at the canal we tell stories in
06:23
the shadow of the war memorial in the
06:25
shadow of the small bus of military
06:29
generals and leaders and so on we tell
06:31
the story of the rideau canal being
06:33
built in the number of workers that died
06:34
there the struggle that it took place to
06:36
create that part of until we talk about
06:38
the number because you died actually
06:40
building apartment there’s lots of
06:41
monuments to people who passed away
06:43
often tragically often in great service
06:46
on that hill but there’s nothing no
06:48
monument to the workers who actually
06:49
died building apartment we tell stories
06:52
of strikes and labour unrest and of
06:55
course they eat the Eddy site which will
06:57
come back to a minute this is being
07:00
massively developed now my windmill
07:04
developers so the walking tour is
07:06
something that we conduct sometimes when
07:08
my students have conducted sometimes
07:09
just volunteers in the workers History
07:11
Museum conducted but now we’re producing
07:14
this leaflet so that people can do a
07:15
self conducted tour we’ve done it for
07:18
Union conferences being in town we’ve
07:21
done for the CH a for the committee for
07:24
labor history and as you can see it is
07:27
fairly well illustrator so taking it to
07:31
the streets telling stories literally by
07:33
walking the streets looking at the
07:35
building’s challenging the commemorative
07:37
nationalist competitive landscape I just
07:39
really putting out a different story
07:42
using the same spaces we also tell
07:45
stories we have prominent storytellers
07:48
come and for specific events this is a
07:51
one person story about the alimentaire
07:55
the women who made match match sticks
07:58
and suffered enormously from from doing
08:02
so and it’s one event that we do so
08:07
storytelling is a spontaneous thing it
08:10
sometimes in cafes it happens sometimes
08:12
in labor halls it happens sometimes at
08:16
university so it’s a matter of trying to
08:19
repopulate various parts of the city by
08:21
having different stories and appealing
08:23
to drawing in different audiences with
08:25
each of our events with each of these
08:27
activities we draw in a different sort
08:29
of community a different group within in
08:31
the community for example Ottawa
08:34
storytellers are very well known within
08:36
Ottawa and we get that community and
08:39
telling story of labor history to people
08:41
who might normally not really a paid
08:43
much attention to those stories we also
08:46
develop very small traveling exhibits
08:48
these are very portable bang them up
08:50
this is this one here simply you know
08:54
flip down fold fold and it’s a large
08:57
green case we can take that anywhere we
08:58
take it into schools we take it into
09:01
heritage fairs we take it into
09:05
universities we take it to labor
09:07
conferences we take it to all sorts of
09:10
events and we have a whole three or four
09:12
of these now this one is is actually
09:14
about bank street auto West Main Street
09:16
which emily is going to talk about in a
09:17
minute and as this suggests it’s also
09:20
the museum also reaches out and and
09:23
works collaboratively in this case with
09:25
the Carlton Center for history and
09:26
Carleton University we also make larger
09:29
ones one of our very first ones was was
09:31
family leave and this was a story that
09:35
obviously we found a narrative that was
09:38
completely forgotten about that nobody
09:40
owes organized labor anything knowing
09:42
your new news are waste of time it’s a
09:44
narrative we hear constantly on
09:47
Parliament constantly from the
09:49
Conservative government especially but
09:51
we also found it you know in in normal
09:53
conversation everyday conversation with
09:55
people that you know why do you need
09:56
trade unions what a trading is giving us
09:58
what is the labor movement never given
09:59
us we don’t need it and then you said
10:01
point out things like well did you just
10:04
enjoy parentally where did you enjoy
10:05
family maybe you enjoy spending time
10:07
with your children did you enjoy health
10:09
care do you enjoy those sorts of
10:11
insurance thing where do you think those
10:13
came from those were just given to us by
10:15
benign conservative liberal whatever
10:18
government these are things that we
10:19
thought again fought for struggled for
10:22
and and often with some personal cost
10:24
and so family leave tells that story and
10:27
it’s again a traveling exhibit it zips
10:30
down and control this being right around
10:33
Canada I won’t play this clip this is
10:35
not working but there’s also an
10:36
Associated video with that to promote it
10:39
actually fundraising video but including
10:41
clips of people who had actually
10:43
followed in those struggles and suffered
10:44
in their own workplaces by fighting and
10:47
demanding those sorts of sorts of rights
10:50
this inspired us to actually move to a
10:52
third form of history making which was
10:56
actually making documentary films and
10:57
one of the most recent ones is on Cal
11:00
vest who is a diplomat very important
11:02
government very important
11:04
Canadian political figure who have
11:06
really been ignored completely and this
11:09
is a video as a company also of another
11:11
port will exhibit in has been traveling
11:13
schools and school teachers have been
11:14
using a lot and not surprisingly it’s
11:17
enormously popular in great demand
11:18
during Black History Month but we also
11:23
as a museum we seize opportunity so what
11:27
makes it so exciting work with museums
11:28
and we never know what’s actually going
11:30
to come up and what’s going from around
11:31
the corner and this is a very delicate
11:35
discussion going on within the museum at
11:37
the moment but one of the things that we
11:39
were approached to do that area around
11:40
the show DFL said I mentioned EB Eddie’s
11:43
was the matchmaking company they’re
11:45
closed down sold off by domtar
11:48
eventually and is now windmill
11:50
development what we were invited to do
11:52
was to capture these extraordinary this
11:55
extraordinary space dozens and dozens of
11:57
buildings interiors and systematically
12:00
we got some volunteer photographers
12:02
you’ve gone systematic if you’re every
12:04
single building through every single
12:05
footage of that space every square foot
12:07
is being reported we have 36 hours of
12:10
video we have 75,000 photographs of this
12:14
that is going to be training the country
12:16
and exhibits it’s going to be a calendar
12:18
it’s going to be put online and this is
12:23
just one of the photographs so seizing
12:25
the opportunity within 18 months we the
12:28
museum managed to find about 16 17
12:30
photographers I think to come in and
12:33
just do this systematically so it’s it’s
12:37
a matter also of being able to be
12:39
spontaneous and argue being a museum
12:41
without walls we don’t put a lot of
12:43
effort into those day by day week by
12:45
week month
12:46
month productions that museums with
12:49
walls half the face we can actually
12:51
afford to drop certain projects and jump
12:53
on certain opportunities and be very
12:55
flexible in what we do and so capturing
12:58
heritage before it’s all four down and
13:00
either return to the edge napping people
13:03
or turned into condos remains to be seen
13:06
that’s that’s the investor Engstrom
13:09
there we also are really good at finding
13:12
spaces we have a very moment that
13:14
basically targets spaces where we can
13:16
identify space that could actually hold
13:18
an exhibit we lobbied for it and so
13:22
there’s a development at britannia park
13:24
which is a leisure of area community
13:25
center where the trends used to take
13:28
working-class people like to the beach
13:29
we told that story we did it through a
13:32
temporary exhibit we had storytellers
13:35
tell stories about life there and the
13:38
entertainment that took place there but
13:40
also they the growth of capitalism and
13:42
the expectation of working people’s
13:44
measure time by by corporations but the
13:48
City of Ottawa we shall be for specific
13:51
space and we were given part of the
13:53
community centers about anyone coming
13:55
into the community center whether
13:57
they’re there for pensioners meetings
13:58
whether they’re for school meetings
14:00
whether that they’re just a play with
14:02
the ants or butterflies or whatever the
14:04
local teachers brought in from the
14:06
tandem each will see this now as a
14:09
history the beach and where I’m involved
14:11
right now in
14:13
another one which is about EV ND and
14:16
it’s we graph the wall in 251 community
14:19
center and center town so anyone going
14:22
for jog to the spokes or any of the
14:24
meetings there will see a permanent
14:26
except that we a temporary exhibit but
14:29
it will be there for three years of
14:30
moment money be Eddie so we have this no
14:33
degree movement what we just if we see
14:35
his face that might be able to hold an
14:36
exhibit we think of the stories that
14:38
could be told there and we will all be
14:40
strongly for and our last project our
14:46
most recent project is on Bank Street
14:48
auto s main street and I’m just going to
14:50
be talking more about about this in
14:52
about 30 seconds this is a wonderful
14:56
project that brings together in
14:58
collaboration between a private company
14:59
as well as the workers History Museum
15:02
and currently university so now what I’d
15:05
say is what we’re trying to do here is
15:07
repopulate the commemorative landscape
15:09
we’re not drying we’re not forcing we’re
15:12
not driving forceful counter narratives
15:14
we’re doing it in a very subtle and very
15:16
slow very quiet way but we want to show
15:19
that we are here we are present and
15:21
working people’s experience needs to
15:24
populate that landscape when we populate
15:25
it in different ways through walking
15:27
through virtually through video exhibits
15:30
through small temporary exhibits and now
15:33
as you’ll hear in a second we’re taking
15:36
over the streets
15:53
super so at caitlin’s recommendation I’m
15:57
just going to sort of roll into the end
16:00
of Davis presentation so my name is
16:03
Emily keys I am an Emmy student at
16:05
Carleton University in the public
16:06
History Program and I also worked
16:08
part-time for a historical consultant
16:10
company called mystery and we were very
16:13
lucky to be approached by David to sort
16:17
of come in on this project of the
16:19
workers history museum and the Carlton
16:21
Center for a public history on history
16:23
pink streak so what I’m going to talk to
16:25
you guys a little bit about today is not
16:27
so much the logistics of the projects
16:30
but some of the sites we’ve been looking
16:32
at and some of the stories that were
16:34
trying to tease out or holding to tease
16:36
out from each one so this sites so at
16:41
the moment we’ve selected six sites on
16:44
Bank Street that highlight the history
16:46
of the city the change in businesses and
16:49
the port and most importantly the
16:51
diverse experiences of riggers in Ottawa
16:54
over time and this is over sort of a
16:57
200-year period the last business closed
17:00
in 1997 all the businesses we’re looking
17:03
at are closed but all the sites that
17:06
we’re looking at are still there so five
17:10
of the sites we’ve selected are actually
17:11
physical and one of them is actually a
17:13
route which I’m going to talk about a
17:15
little bit today so I’ll just be
17:17
highlighting three to the sights on Bank
17:20
Street so one of them is the Handy shoe
17:22
repair one of them is the wrong brothers
17:25
fruit store and the last one the route i
17:28
mentioned is the route taken by jewish
17:30
peddlers pebble goods of the long Bank
17:32
Street and through Ottawa so for those
17:35
of you who aren’t familiar with Ottawa
17:36
this is just a highlight and you can see
17:39
sort of the six main sites Bank Street
17:42
starts sort of right by the parliament
17:44
buildings and now goes up up up up way
17:48
so the first thing I’m going to talk to
17:51
you about is handy shoe repair so this
17:54
was located at a
17:56
52 bang street in old ottawa so you can
17:59
see an excellent picture up here
18:01
actually put together by someone else
18:03
who is presenting another pet panel
18:04
right now Sarah Nixon and handy shoe
18:08
repair would have been right where this
18:10
business is right there and while it was
18:13
there sort of on and off between 1940s
18:17
and 1950s there has been a shoe repair
18:19
and shoemaker at that site since 19.7 so
18:23
the man who was first there in 1927 and
18:25
who later came back to the site in 40s
18:27
and 50s was named Fred caustic but we
18:31
don’t actually know much about mr.
18:33
caustic but we do know that he was
18:34
Russian and he is buried at beechwood
18:37
Cemetery in Ottawa it doesn’t appear
18:39
that he had any family living in Ottawa
18:41
just from the notation but he is listed
18:44
as a retired shoemaker so we know that
18:46
he would have been repairing and making
18:48
shoes at that site so in between sort of
18:52
his occupation of the site there are a
18:54
number of other owners and people who
18:57
are coming in and working at the sites
18:58
and what’s interesting is that they all
19:00
seem to live either above below right
19:03
next door to the business and so what we
19:06
don’t know very much about mr. caustic
19:09
we do know quite a bit about a shoe
19:11
repair business in Ottawa currently one
19:15
of the rare businesses that is still
19:17
open run by a man named egg mondo Inc
19:19
indeedy so this is a very young at mondo
19:23
this is his image on his passport when
19:26
he was immigrating from Italy to Canada
19:28
and the 1960s so interestingly um when
19:34
he arrived here he worked at a shoe
19:37
manufacturer and a shoe repair business
19:39
also on main street called hackett shoe
19:41
repair down in center found if any of
19:44
you are familiar with the area it’s up
19:45
very close to brahma soul of the diner
19:48
right by bank street and the business
19:51
unfortunately is closed and there is a
19:53
surrounding their now called fauna
19:54
you’re an odd when you see it we’re
19:56
talking about so after working at tap at
20:01
shoe repair for a couple of years he was
20:03
able to save up and buy his own shoe
20:06
repair business over in overbrook and he
20:10
has operated that business for 42 years
20:12
he’s still operating it and he’s very
20:15
popular in the city there are people who
20:17
come in all the way from petawawa to
20:19
have their shoes repaired there were
20:21
some interviews done by the workers
20:23
history museum with mr. impunity and his
20:28
son and they really talk about the
20:30
returning customers who really seemed to
20:32
love coming back to him coming back to
20:34
the site and the quality of work that he
20:36
does and so this is a photo of senior
20:43
Eduardo indeed done in 2012 by the
20:46
citizen and these are some of his tools
20:48
and what’s interesting is because he was
20:50
trained as a shoe manufacturer in Italy
20:52
in the 1950s these tools would be
20:55
similar to the ones used by mr. caustic
20:57
over at handy shoe repair on Bank Street
21:03
so the next site the next business is
21:06
the wrong brothers fruit store and this
21:09
is a story of the Wang family so
21:12
interestingly while Ottawa never
21:14
developed a sort of large Chinese
21:16
community say as some of the other
21:18
cities there is a very early Chinese
21:21
present in the city and many of them
21:23
owned businesses on Main Street so these
21:26
were cafes restaurants and laundries so
21:29
on like these families mr. ershon Wang
21:34
emigrated to Canada in the 1900s and he
21:37
worked with his brother at his uncle’s
21:39
laundromat on Murray Street and
21:42
interesting way enough during our
21:44
research we sort of were able to tease
21:45
out a couple of interesting facts
21:47
usually laundries were most often run by
21:51
a family some people had to joke that
21:53
there are the most easy workers to get
21:55
because you know they have to
21:57
work with you because you’re related to
21:58
you but it usually you had to save
22:00
around 500 to 600 dollars to start your
22:03
own business during time and in 1916
22:06
there are at least a dozen Chinese
22:09
identified businesses on Bank Street so
22:14
this is sheng wang son Gordon Gordon
22:18
took over the business after june one
22:22
retired later but i’ll get to that so
22:24
Shane Long eventually accumulated a sort
22:28
of enough wealth to start his own fruit
22:30
store and I believe at 757 bank street
22:33
if any of you are familiar with the area
22:35
originally it was called sanitary fruit
22:37
store and later he changed the name
22:39
what’s interesting about this family is
22:42
they had a number of children but the
22:45
Chinese community Ottawa really
22:46
highlights a number of achievements of
22:48
his children including Leslie who was
22:51
the first Ottawa born chinese-canadian
22:53
graduate from Queens University in
22:56
Kingston and as a team Leslie was the
22:59
captain of the Chinese aces which is a
23:01
Chinese Canadian hockey team in Ottawa
23:05
this is the team photo and all the
23:08
members were Chinese Canadians they were
23:10
from sort of five core families that had
23:13
emigrated and they all net and practiced
23:17
together on rideau canal they have a
23:19
really unique and interesting story and
23:22
so another of mr. Wong’s of sorry mr.
23:26
Shane sons Gordon was a coach and it’s
23:29
Gordon who takes over the business after
23:31
his father and like mr. amando indeedy
23:35
they operate that business for 60 years
23:37
and it closes in 1997 and a lot of the
23:41
residents of the glebe recall fondly how
23:44
lovely the family were how they would
23:46
take the time to deliver groceries to
23:49
the elderly how they we even put away
23:50
the groceries and make sure that they
23:52
were well cared for so the last site I’m
23:57
going to talk to you though today isn’t
23:59
a site at all it’s a route so similar to
24:02
each I
24:03
community there’s an early Jewish
24:05
presence in Ottawa it’s not as large as
24:08
not sure our Toronto but it starts up in
24:11
a bill to late 1890s and it’s primarily
24:14
sort of confined to lower town to the
24:16
Byward market but soon spreads out over
24:19
the city one of the interviews done by
24:22
the Ottawa Jewish archives with a former
24:24
peddler named Lazarus greenberg
24:26
essentially explains why so many new
24:29
Jewish immigrants were attracted to
24:31
peddling he explains that if he wanted
24:34
to observe sort of the customs involved
24:37
in the culture and religion you had to
24:38
be a peddler that was the only way you
24:40
could really do it at the time also the
24:44
pedaling license was much much cheaper
24:45
in Ottawa compared to Montreal in
24:49
Montreal you were charged four dollars
24:51
for a peddler on foot for a license 60
24:55
if you had hand cart and 100 if you have
24:57
wagon as opposed to in Ottawa it was a
25:00
flat nine dollar rate for the year and
25:02
for those of you who aren’t familiar
25:04
with what pedaling is exactly it
25:07
involves collecting and selling scrap
25:09
metal fruit cloth rags and what you do
25:13
is you would take these wares and you
25:15
would take them around the city to sell
25:17
residence so returning to mr. Greenberg
25:21
actually he is one of the peddlers who
25:24
went up into what’s now czar called Alta
25:27
Vista area at the time was more no miss
25:30
Billings bridge and he is remembered
25:33
fondly by the residents also because he
25:36
ended up starting his own grocery store
25:37
they’re called Greenberg’s and he got
25:41
his license in 1940 answered worked his
25:44
way up from a cart to a bicycle and to a
25:46
car and just as a bit of context these
25:49
two images this one is from 1950s from
25:53
1955 and this one
25:56
from 19 15 two and a half three minutes
26:02
perfect right on schedule um so now I’m
26:05
just going to talk to you a little bit
26:06
about the app development so I can’t
26:09
remember five mention to the seventh
26:10
inning I probably did the goal of the
26:14
project at the moment is to create
26:17
mobile app so that people visiting the
26:20
city will be able to look at these sites
26:22
look at archival material listen to oral
26:26
histories and really sort of get a sense
26:28
of what it was like to either work at
26:31
this business to be a customer of that
26:33
business in just the history of the site
26:35
over time so while nothing is set in
26:38
stone we’ve been experimenting using a
26:41
website called movin cube what it allows
26:43
you to do is build an app completely
26:46
free the caveat is that you do have to
26:49
deal with some pesky ads from time to
26:51
time but we found it really useful to
26:54
sort of conceptualize our product so
26:57
what we’re hoping is that we will have
27:00
sort of a number of pages so we’ll have
27:03
sort of the main page explaining a
27:05
little bit about the project users will
27:07
be able to select whichever side they
27:09
would like to look at and to look at it
27:10
on a map then by sucking site they’ll be
27:16
able to explore different items
27:18
photographs artifacts whatever they’re
27:22
sort of interested in in in terms of
27:24
where we hope you out go or hoping we’ll
27:26
be able to develop some sort of user
27:29
feedback whether you can contribute on
27:31
story about the site whether you can
27:33
suggest sites that you’d like to see
27:36
sort of coming into the future and Raven
27:38
sherry so the next stage of the project
27:41
at the moment is to start conducting
27:44
oral history interviews with community
27:46
residents former business owner
27:48
and former workers to really understand
27:50
the relationship that is developed
27:52
between a person and a specific place
27:56
thank you thank you to both
28:19
you

Previously published on [Website Name] and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

 

***

If you believe in the work we are doing here at The Good Men Project and want to join our calls on a regular basis, please join us as a Premium Member, today.

All Premium Members get to view The Good Men Project with NO ADS.

Need more info? A complete list of benefits is here.

Photo credit: iStockphoto.com

Next Post