Abu Dhabi resident’s film gets picked for Israeli film festival

Noble Horvath


a person standing next to a fence: Abu Dhabi resident's film gets picked for Israeli film festival


© Provided by Khaleej Times
Abu Dhabi resident’s film gets picked for Israeli film festival

Indian expat Shaheer Sha is jubilant as his short film on environmental issues is part of an Israeli film festival.

‘Recognition’, a 23-minute film shot in Ras Al Khaimah, was picked for the first Carmel International Short Film Festival to be held virtually in Israel’s Zikhron Yaakov this month. It is the only selection from the Middle East.

“I am proud that my work is the only representation of the UAE at an Israeli film festival. ‘Recognition’ is a suspense film aimed at highlighting environmental challenges and a message on water conservation for this generation.”

Sha has been in Abu Dhabi since 2001 and works as a sales and marketing supervisor at a private firm. The 42-year-old aspiring filmmaker from Kerala had previously directed two short films and

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FILM REVIEW: Time – The BFI London Film Festival 2020

Noble Horvath

Reviewer: Maryam Philpott

“Desperate people do desperate things” Sibil Fox Richardson explains at the beginning of Garrett Bradley’s documentary Time, but how long should a punishment really last? When her husband was sentence to an extreme 60-years in jail for armed robbery, Richardson was left to raise their six children alone, and Time examines the 20-years the family has spent fighting for a reduction in his sentence.

In a way this is more Richardson’s film than Bradley’s, filled with home movies and recordings of her speaking, the culmination of two decades of a publicity machine that has unrelentingly campaigned for Robert’s release. And Richardson has spent every New Year during this time knowing that this will be the year he comes home, a belief that Time shows has entirely consumed the family’s life during this period.

What is interesting about these candid interviews is that this is not a

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FILM REVIEW: Herself – The BFI London Film Festival 2020

Noble Horvath

Writers: Clare Dunne and Malcolm Campbell

Director: Phyllida Lloyd

Sometimes, a film speaks entirely to the moment of its release more profoundly than its creators could have predicted, and in the 2020 London Film Festival there is probably none more timely than Herself. With incidences of domestic violence rising under lockdown this summer and our wider appreciation of what being at home really means, Clare Dunne and Malcolm Campbell’s story of a Dublin mother trying to build her own home aligns perfectly with contemporary experience.

After enduring years of abuse Sandra and her two young daughters finally escape husband Gary and are placed in temporary accommodation by Dublin Council. Working two jobs as a cleaner, Sandra seeks something more permanent among the grotty and expensive flats available until she comes across a YouTube video about building a house from scratch. Supported by her employer, Sandra must keep the project

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China’s classical music festival to feature Wuhan musicians

Noble Horvath
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Musicians from the Wuhan Philharmonic Orchestra rehearse a day before their concert to open the Beijing Music Festival, China’s first classical music festival since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, in Beijing, Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. China is holding its first classical music festival since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic featuring musicians from the global epicenter of Wuhan, in an attempt to aid in the psychological and emotional healing process.

AP

China is holding its first classical music festival since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, featuring musicians from the former epicenter of Wuhan in an attempt to aid in the psychological and emotional healing process.

Zou Ye, a composer from the central Chinese city where the virus was first detected late last year, said that Saturday night’s concert is part of an effort to work through frustration and helplessness on the way toward love and

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A New Theatre Festival Announces Lineup

Noble Horvath

Homecoming: A New Theatre Festival will take place 10 – 14 November, 2020.

Homecoming: A New Theatre Festival Announces Lineup

Award-winning genre explorers Encompass Productions return to the White Bear Theatre with HOMECOMING: A NEW THEATRE FESTIVAL, hosting five world premieres. A celebration of theatre returning to its true home – the stage – Homecoming features new work from a wide array of London’s very best theatre companies and award-winning talent:

TUES 10 NOV: TOO CLOSE TO THE BONE by Louisiana & Splutter Theatre companies

A riveting psychological comedy-thriller, or perhaps a tale of survival and the meaning of justice? Or a reunion of sorts but what are they hiding? Are they hiding anything? Theatre companies Louisiana and Splutter Theatre finally come together for the long-awaited debut collaboration that nobody asked for: Too Close to The Bone. Combining Splutter’s hefty experience of horror and Louisiana’s love of dad jokes to create a darkly absurdist world of unhinged

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FILM REVIEW: 200 Meters – The BFI London Film Festival 2020

Noble Horvath

Writer and Director: Ameen Nayfeh

Dividing countries with a wall may be a populist political strategy for countries worried about immigration but it is the families and workers who must travel to both sides every day that pay a significant human cost. Ameen Nayfeh’s new film 200 Meters is about a family divided between the West Bank and Israel, a journey-film in which a group of strangers, each with their own agenda, must undertake an illegal road trip to the other side of the wall.

Mustafa lives on the West Bank 200 metres from the wall that divides him from the house his wife shares with their children in Israel. Refusing the Israeli ID that allows his family to travel freely, Mustafa obtains a work permit to travel across each day but expired paperwork leaves him with no way of crossing the divide when his son is rushed to hospital

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Travel agency: The 23rd United Nations Association Film Festival takes you around the world, via the internet | News

Noble Horvath

Even in a global pandemic, the nonprofit United Nations Association Film Festival endures, presenting entirely online this year (its 23rd) a program of 60 documentaries over 11 days, beginning Oct. 15. UNAFF Founder and Executive Director Jasmina Bojic continues to think globally and act locally with this year’s array of offerings, including several films with a local connection as well as opportunities for discussion and networking via Zoom panels, salons, and outreach to schools and libraries, kids, seniors, and veterans.

In a useful change, films will be available to screen any time during the day on which they’re scheduled. Organizers hope that flexibility will also encourage festival goers to digitally mosey over to the fest’s daily 6 p.m. Zoom sessions, where filmmakers and their subjects, as well as other special guests, will mingle amongst audience members for a combination of the day’s highlights, Q&A and informal chit chat.

Of course,

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A Brooklyn Book Festival Panel

Noble Horvath

As part of its programming for Virtual Children’s Day this past Saturday, October 3, the Brooklyn Book Festival hosted “Spooky Stories!” via Crowdcast, moderated by Max Brallier (The Last Kids on Earth series, Viking) and featuring middle grade authors R.L. Stine (Goosebumps series, Scholastic), Claribel A. Ortega (Ghost Squad, Scholastic Press), and Sophie Escabasse (Witches of Brooklyn, Random House Graphic). Due to ongoing Covid-19 restrictions, the free literary festival, held from September 28–October 5 this year, ventured into the virtual space.

After author and book introductions, Brallier kicked off the panel with a seasonally appropriate question: had any of the panelists experienced a legitimate supernatural encounter?

Middle grade debut author Ortega went first. While they hadn’t experienced anything personally, they did grow up hearing about instances that had “definitely happened” to their family. “One of the things that stood out to me is that, when living in

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FILM REVIEW: Undine -The BFI London Film Festival 2020

Noble Horvath

Writer and Director: Christian Petzold

Love me or die is an intimidating proposition, but one that protagonist Undine puts to Johannes in a quiet café in the first minutes of Christian Petzold’s new film. At this point you may be expecting a torrid psychodrama but Undine herself and the film that follows, with its touches of fantasy, is nowhere near as conventional as its opening frame suggests.

Abandoned by her lover, tour guide Undine fatefully meets industrial diver Christoph that same day when a fish tank breaks over them. From there, a water-based affair begins as the couple fall passionately in love. But just as the heroine settles into this new happiness, Johannes (Jacob Matschenz) returns to rekindle their relationship and a terrible accident throws everything into confusion.

Petzold’s film, showing in the Love strand of the London Film Festival, is on the surface a traditional boy meets girl story

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FILM REVIEW: Honeymood – The BFI London Film Festival 2020

Noble Horvath

Writer and Director: Talya Lavie

No one sleeps in Jerusalem in this wry rom com from Tayla Lavie. It might be expected the two newlyweds in Honeymood would have good reason to stay awake on their wedding night, but sex is far from their minds as jealousies and misunderstandings force them out into the streets and into a series of strange encounters with other insomniacs.

Noam’s father has booked the Royal Suite in the Waldorf Astoria for the happy couple, but they soon decide they aren’t so happy when Eleanor finds that Noam’s ex-girlfriend has given him a ring during the marriage ceremony. Eleanor wants to return it and so the couple go out into the night air leaving the luxury of the hotel room behind to find her.

At first the humour is comfortably rom com and there are some funny moments involving hotel key cards and even a

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