Arsenal captain Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang has donated one of his Black Lives Matter shirts to the Museum of London to support their ‘Collecting Covid’ project.

The Black Lives Matter protest against racism shook the entire world at a time when most countries including England were on lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Following the restart of the 2019-20 Premier League season in July, all 20 clubs added the Black Lives Matter logo to their shirts to show solidarity with the BLM movement.

Aubameyang’s shirt is the first item collected by the museum and it will be used to highlight the role football played in creating social change.

“I am proud to be the latest black player to captain Arsenal and it’s an honour to have the opportunity to donate my Black Lives Matter shirt to the Museum of London’s Collecting Covid project,” Aubameyang told the club website.

“I hope this will be remembered as the moment that football stood against all forms of racism and that it will inspire young people for the future.”

The Collecting Covid project is aimed at gathering records of Londoners’ lives during the coronavirus pandemic which will help the future generation learn about the events.

“We are very excited about the generous offer from the captain of Arsenal, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang,” said Foteini Aravani, digital curator at the Museum of London.

“Arsenal has always served to create a sense of community for people in north London, across the UK and around the world from their first match in 1886 to now being one of London’s most successful football clubs. This jersey, part of Arsenal’s Black Lives Matter tribute kit, will be a very important addition to the growing number of objects the Museum of London is acquiring as part of our Collecting Covid project.

“This contemporary collecting builds upon the museum’s rich collection of protest and activism, from the Suffragettes to the Brixton Riots and from the Brian Haw collection to Occupy London. Aubameyang’s jersey will join these items to act as an important reflection and response to Black Lives Matter as a movement and its resonance through London and its people.”