Nearly four years after a ride malfunction at an Australian theme park left four people dead, the company that operates the venue has been fined more than $2 million.



a statue of a person jumping in the air: GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 16: Patrons pose for a photo at the entrance of Dreamworld on September 16, 2020 in Gold Coast, Australia. Dreamworld and its sister park White Water World have reopened to the public after the theme parks were closed in March over coronavirus concerns. Under the park's new COVID-19 safe plan, visitor numbers have been reduced and some rides and attractions will remain closed. Visitors will need to maintain physical distancing from other guests, and additional handwashing and hand sanitiser stations have been installed throughout the park. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)


© Quinn Rooney
GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA – SEPTEMBER 16: Patrons pose for a photo at the entrance of Dreamworld on September 16, 2020 in Gold Coast, Australia. Dreamworld and its sister park White Water World have reopened to the public after the theme parks were closed in March over coronavirus concerns. Under the park’s new COVID-19 safe plan, visitor numbers have been reduced and some rides and attractions will remain closed. Visitors will need to maintain physical distancing from other guests, and additional handwashing and hand sanitiser stations have been installed throughout the park. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

On Monday, Ardent Leisure — a company that owns multiple amusement parks — was fined 3.6 million Australian dollars, which equates to about $2.5 million, in connection with the deaths of the four park-goers, CNN reported.

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This past summer, Ardent Leisure pleaded guilty to three safety charges.

The four people — Kate Goodchild, Roozi Araghi, Cindy Low and Luke Dorsett — died in October 2016 after a collision on the Queensland park’s Thunder River Rapids ride caused the raft they were aboard to flip over, according to CNN. Two children survived the incident: Goodchild’s daughter, 12, and Low’s son, 10.

Ardent Leisure’s chairman, Garry Weiss, and the CEO of its theme parks division, John Osbourne, apologized “unreservedly for the past circumstances and failures at Dreamworld” in a statement to Australian outlet Nine News.

“Ardent accepts responsibility for this tragedy without qualification or reservation,” reads their statement. “Today we accept the Court’s decision to impose a fine of $3.6 million which is the largest fine in Queensland history for a workplace tragedy.”

Ardent Leisure had reportedly faced a potential fine of up to 4.5 million Australian dollars.

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