The Washington Post has a great interactive guide for traveling safe during the holidays

Noble Horvath

© Caleb Jones, Associated Press A man sits on a nearly empty Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. After a summer marked by a surge of coronavirus cases in Hawaii, officials plan to reboot the tourism based economy later this month despite concerns about the state’s pre-travel testing […]



a body of water with a city in the background: A man sits on a nearly empty Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. After a summer marked by a surge of coronavirus cases in Hawaii, officials plan to reboot the tourism based economy later this month despite concerns about the state’s pre-travel testing program.


© Caleb Jones, Associated Press
A man sits on a nearly empty Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. After a summer marked by a surge of coronavirus cases in Hawaii, officials plan to reboot the tourism based economy later this month despite concerns about the state’s pre-travel testing program.

The Washington Post recently published an interactive guide for how to travel safely during the holidays this year.

The coronavirus pandemic will surely impact the way we travel. Some may not travel at all during the holidays. Others may be a little more interested in traveling across the country to see their family.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that traveling increases your risk of getting the novel coronavirus. Staying home remains the best way to stay safe from COVID-19.

The Washington Post helps you make sense of all the guidelines. Head over to the guide. You’ll be asked to answer the following questions:

  • Who are you traveling with?
  • How are your traveling?
  • Where are you staying?
  • What are you bringing?
  • Are you getting a coronavirus test before going?

The guide will then give you tips on what to bring, how to stay safe and what you might need to do before you travel.

Dr. Anthony Fauci recently said you might want to put off Thanksgiving dinner this year, which I wrote about for Deseret.com.

  • “But what we’re starting to see now — and we can’t run away from it — we’re starting to see in the Midwest and the Northwest an uptick in test positivity which tends to be a predictor that you’re going to have surges. When you go into the fall and winter, the weather’s colder, you tend to be indoors. When you’re indoors it becomes more problematic to be able to block the transmission of infection.”
  • “I say that some people in this country are going to be a relatively normal type of a Thanksgiving but in other areas of the country, it’s gonna be — you better hold off and maybe just have immediate family. Make sure you do it in a way that people wear masks and you don’t have large crowds of people. You know, I’d like to say that everything is gonna be great by Thanksgiving, but I’m not so sure it is.”
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